Bookmark this page on your mobile

QR Code image

What is this?

Daily Court Reporter - News Total Ohio infant deaths rise in 2016 while sleep-related deaths decline

 

Total Ohio infant deaths rise in 2016 while sleep-related deaths decline

The number of Ohio infants who died before their first birthday increased from 1,005 in 2015 to 1,024 in 2016, according to a new report released by the Ohio Department of Health (ODH). The report also contains some promising news with fewer sleep-related infant deaths than in 2015. Sleep-related infant deaths have been trending downward over time, corresponding with intensive state and local initiatives to promote safe sleep practices.

“While we have seen some progress in preventing sleep-related infant deaths, we still have a lot of work to do, particularly in the areas of premature births and racial disparities. That is why the state is investing millions of dollars in local initiatives that will help more Ohio babies reach their first birthdays, particularly in high-risk communities and populations,” said ODH Director Lance Himes.

Ohio’s focus on preventing sleep-related infant deaths through public awareness campaigns and programs to provide free cribs to eligible parents is making some headway. In 2016, there were 22 percent fewer sleep-related infant deaths than in 2015.

Prematurity-related conditions, such as preterm birth before 37 weeks of pregnancy, are the leading cause of infant deaths in Ohio. Although the number of prematurity-related infant deaths increased from 2015 to 2016, Ohio’s prematurity infant mortality rate – the number of preterm infant deaths per 1,000 live births – has not changed significantly in the past decade.

Ohio is addressing many of the contributing factors related to premature births such as smoking, and identifying and treating women at risk of developing diabetes and high blood pressure during pregnancy, conditions which increase the risk of having a preterm or low-birth-weight baby. One of the more successful interventions is the use of a hormone medication, progesterone, in at-risk women to help reduce the likelihood of preterm birth.

The current state budget dedicates nearly $50 million to improving birth outcomes and reducing racial and ethnic disparities, and builds on almost $87 million in investments made during the past six years.

The majority of state funding is dedicated to supporting local community-driven proposals to combat infant mortality in high-risk areas.

Nine metropolitan areas accounted for 59 percent of all infant deaths, and 86 percent of African-American infant deaths, in Ohio in 2016: Butler Co., Cleveland/Cuyahoga Co., Columbus/Franklin Co., Cincinnati/Hamilton Co., Toledo/Lucas Co., Youngstown/Mahoning Co., Dayton/Montgomery Co., Canton/Stark Co., and Akron/Summit Co. In these communities, local infant mortality coalitions are pursuing promising practices to reduce infant mortality supported by state and federal funding.

During the next two years, additional community-based pilot programs with proven track records in reducing infant mortality will be launched, and the evidence-based CenteringPregnancy® group prenatal care model will be expanded.

Ohio also will leverage federal grants to support local infant mortality initiatives during the next year:

• • To assist 27 Ohio counties at risk for poor birth or childhood developmental outcomes to expand local voluntary, evidence-based home visiting services to women during pregnancy, and to parents with young children.

• • To assist 14 Ohio counties with the highest infant mortality rates for African-American babies to promote healthy pregnancies, positive birth outcomes, and healthy infant growth and development.

Ohio’s goal is to reach the national objective of a 6.0 infant mortality rate or lower in every race and ethnicity group. An infant mortality rate is calculated as the number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births. Ohio’s overall (all races) infant mortality rate increased from 7.2 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2015 to 7.4 in 2016. The white infant mortality rate increased from 5.5 to 5.8, and the black infant mortality rate increased from 15.1 to 15.2, with black babies dying at nearly three times the rate as white babies. However, Ohio’s infant mortality rates are trending downward over time.

The complete 2016 Ohio Infant Mortality Report including data by county, a list of new initiatives to address infant mortality, and a summary of initiatives over the past six years is available online at: http://www.odh.ohio.gov/odhprograms/cfhs/octpim/latestoimd.aspx. Ohio’s infant mortality website contains infant mortality tools, resources and information at www.PreventInfantMortality.ohio.gov.

About the Ohio Department of Health

The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) is a cabinet-level agency, meaning the director reports to the governor and serves as a member of the Executive Branch of Ohio’s government. The ODH executive team helps the Director of Health formulate the agency’s strategic policy goals and objectives. The team is composed of the Chief of Staff, the Medical Director and the General Counsel. These leaders, along with agency senior-level managers and supervisors, work in tandem to ensure the state health department is responsive to the needs of Ohio’s 11.5 million residents.

ODH’s mission is to protect and improve the health of all Ohioans by preventing disease, promoting good health and assuring access to quality care.

Date Published: October 27, 2017

 

Ohio Department of Health

 

Twelve people indicted installing credit-card skimmers on gas pumps in five states and stealing account information from thousands

Twelve people were charged in a 26-count indictment for their roles in a conspiracy to install credit-card skimmers on gas pumps in at least five states, including several locations in Northeast Ohio, and steal credit-card account information from thousands of people.

Robes on the road

The Ohio Supreme Court didn’t step tentatively into its Off-Site Court Program. At launch, the Court scheduled seven sessions in 18 months outside of its Columbus courtroom. That bold start began in 1987 – 30 years ago this October – and was spearheaded by the late Chief Justice Thomas J. Moyer.

Ohio House passes legislation that would rename part of state highway after Ohio-born singer, actor Roy Rogers

Lawmakers in the Ohio House of Representatives by a 91-1 vote recently passed a bill that would name a section of a state highway in Scioto County for a favorite son of the region.

Texas man indicted for having nine pounds of heroin

A Texas man was indicted after federal court after being arrested with nearly four kilograms of heroin, law enforcement officials said.

Study highlights growth of organic agriculture in Ohio

Ohio now 7th in the nation in the number of organic farms

Lawmakers want loophole for drug dealers closed

Prompted by the ongoing public health crisis resulting from opioid addiction's grip on the Buckeye State, a pair of Republican lawmakers are hopeful their bill will aid in pinning manslaughter charges on drug dealers whose clients die from an overdose.

Influenza season begins; ideal time to get flu shot

Flu vaccination best protection against illness and missed work or school

Auditor Yost and Senator Lehner introduce bill to curb Medicaid fraud

Auditor of State Dave Yost and Sen. Peggy Lehner recently announced legislation to stop the kind of Medicaid fraud and overpayments that have cost taxpayers nearly $29 million since 2011 and deprived Medicaid patients of the care those dollars are intended to provide.

Department of Higher Education announces regional RAPIDS awards

$2.9 million approved for collaborative workforce development projects in the Western, Northern Appalachia, and Central Ohio regions

WSU med students raise money for hurricane relief efforts

Medical students at the Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine raised more than $1,500 for hurricane relief efforts through a bake sale and a Taste of the South food event.

2017-18 swimming and diving teams to compete in final season at WSU

Following its spring announcement that Wright State University was eliminating its men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams because of university-wide budget cuts, Wright State is confirming that the 2017-18 season will be the final season of competition for those teams.

Wright-Patt’s Gate 12A to close during road surface improvement project

Gate 12A (AFMC HQ gate) will be closed to all inbound and outbound traffic due to scheduled construction beginning Oct. 18.

Sinclair Theatre presents Radio Plays - be soundly scared!

Sinclair Theatre invites you to be SOUNDLY SCARED with Radio Plays – 4 selections of the horror genre presented November 2-5 in Sinclair’s Black Box Theatre, on the fourth floor of Building 2.

The University of Dayton and Premier Health transforming fairgrounds

The University of Dayton and Premier Health have selected an Ohio-based master planning firm, planning NEXT, to develop a community-minded vision for 38 acres on South Main Street, the former home of the Montgomery County fairgrounds.

Treat your family to HallZOOween at the Cincinnati Zoo & BOO-tanical Garden

HallZOOween, presented by Frisch’s Big Boy, kicks off this weekend! Little ghouls and boys can trick-or-treat around the Cincinnati Zoo & BOO-tanical Garden on October 7-8, 14-15, 21-22 & 28-29 from Noon – 5 p.m. Please BYOB (bring your own bag) to help the #GreenestZooinAmerica stay green!

UD football falls to Campbell, 17-7

All the scoring came in the second half as Campbell retained hold of first place in the Pioneer Football League with a 17-7 win at Dayton.

Proposed auto registration tax raises constitutional questions

The Ohio Legislative Service Commission's analysis of a bill calling for a hike in auto registration taxes to fund Ohio roads, highways and transportation infrastructure found that Senate Bill 113 may run counter to at least two clauses of the U.S. Constitution.

Prepare your teen driver for the road ahead

The Ohio Department of Insurance Director Jillian Froment and John Born, Director of the Ohio Department of Public Safety (ODPS), which includes the Ohio State Highway Patrol, are encouraging all parents to talk to their teen drivers about the rules of the road when they are behind the wheel as well as the dangers of distracted driving.

Lawmakers want increased protection for utility workers from threats

Threats directed toward utility workers while on the job presumably have become enough of a problem that a lawmaker duo in the Ohio House of Representatives has proposed expanding the aggravated menacing offense to afford these individuals the statute's protections.

Automation continues to grow at Ohio manufacturers

(Columbus) If robots are indeed taking over the workplace, they've apparently found a home in Ohio.